United Kingdom

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United Kingdom

Edinburgh Airport is Scotland’s busiest airport, welcoming more than 14.7 million people through our doors in 2019. We’re also the 6th busiest airport in the UK. As the place Where Scotland Meets The World, we fly to more than 150 destinations and work with 40 airlines to welcome people to Scotland and take Scotland to the world. Directly employing around 750 staff with a further 7000 across the campus, Edinburgh Airport is owned by Global Infrastructure Partners (GIP), a leading global, independent infrastructure investor. Edinburgh Airport hasn’t always looked the way it does today. We’ve been through some major milestones on the road to becoming the busiest commercial airport in Scotland. Here’s a quick tour of our history. Our story starts back in 1916 when the Turnhouse Aerodrome opened as a World War One military base. In 1918 the airfield became the RAF Turnhouse after the formation of the Royal Air Force. It wasn’t until the start of the Second World War that the first runway was built, after which the first commercial services launched in 1947. Fast forward to the 1970s and BAA takes control of Edinburgh Airport, with the first new terminal officially opened to the public by the Queen in 1977. In the decades to follow the airport continued to grow and develop, and in 2009 a Scottish Enterprise study revealed that the airport could boost Scotland’s economy by £867 million per year. In 2012 Global Infrastructure Partners (GIP) took over ownership from the BAA. This lead to new routes, improved passenger facilities, and a multi-million-pound terminal expansion. Today, we’re the busiest airport in Scotland, flying to more than 150 destinations across the world.

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Birmingham Airport has over 140 direct worldwide destinations, handles over 13 million passengers each year and is located in the heart of England! Minimising the impact of our operations has always been a priority for us. That's why we operate a range of procedures and schemes to ensure we're taking all practical steps to achieve this. Take a look at our Aircraft Noise pages to find out more about what we're doing. In 2016 we published our first Carbon Management Plan, which aimed to build on efforts to reduce our carbon emissions which have seen us achieve a 40% reduction since 2013. In early 2020, we began work on an updated high-level plan to reduce carbon emissions, but during the pandemic our priorities shifted to focus on immediate and direct carbon and energy reduction measures. Taking advantage of the unprecedented fall in traffic and passenger volumes, we examined our operations and infrastructure in detail, with the aim of eliminating as much carbon from our operations as possible. And we have been successful, reducing our emissions by approximately 1700 tonnes, or by 18%, in 2020/21, compared to the previous financial year. While we expect emissions to increase in line with passenger volumes as the recovery gets underway, we are determined that many of the measures we introduced in the pandemic will be extended in the long term, creating a more sustainable operation for the future. We're also fully engaged with the industry's efforts to decarbonise, supporting our partners in IATA, Sustainable Aviation and the Jet Zero Council to decouple the growth in aviation from the growth in emissions. This is being achieved through the development of carbon-efficient airport infrastructure, the introduction of fuel efficient operations, the drive for sustainable aviation fuels and the ultimate delivery of zero-emissions aircraft. We are committed to mitigating the negative impacts of operating an Airport in a densely populated region, but our ambitions go beyond this; we want to be a force for good by investing in the wellbeing of those communities impacted by our operations, many of which are in real need. Our ‘30-30-40’ policy targets investment into areas suffering from high levels of deprivation. We aim to ensure that 30% of all of our Community Investment, both direct and in kind, is directed towards east Birmingham, 30% towards north Solihull while the remaining 40% supports communities in other areas impacted by our operations. Air Quality in the area surrounding the Airport is affected by a wide range of emission sources, the most significant of which is road traffic pollution from local roads and the motorway network. However, Airport operations cause emissions which can also impact local air quality. Our aim is to ensure the Airport does not cause Air Quality emission exceedances in the region, and to work proactively to reduce emissions at the Airport.

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Glasgow Airport is owned by AGS Airports Limited AGS Airports Limited is jointly held by Ferrovial (via Faero UK Limited) and AGS Ventures Airports Limited, an entity managed by Macquarie Infrastructure and Real Assets (Europe) Limited. Derek Provan is the current CEO. Macquarie and Ferrovial have a long and successful history of partnering with each other across a number of infrastructure projects, with partnerships in airports including Bristol Airport and Sydney Airport. Both partners have developed extensive knowledge of aviation and have excellent contacts globally. With more than two decades of experience developing and owning essential infrastructure around the world, Macquarie partners with governments and communities to manage assets that underpin economies including roads, airports, utilities, telecommunications and energy infrastructure. Managing investments on behalf of institutional investors, Macquarie is one of the world’s leading airport owners via its managed funds. Today, Macquarie leverages its deep operational and financial expertise to manage stakes in airports around the world (Aberdeen, Brussels, Cairns, Glasgow, Gold Coast, Hobart, Longreach, Mackay, Mount Isa, Perth, Southampton and Townsville). For more information visit www.macquarie.com Ferrovial has been associated with the aviation industry since 1998 and in that time has invested in 32 airports across the UK, Italy, Australia, Chile and Mexico, among other countries. For more information visit www.ferrovial.com With some 30 airlines serving over 100 destinations worldwide, including Canada, the US, the Caribbean, Europe and the Gulf, Glasgow is Scotland’s principal long-haul airport as well as Scotland’s largest charter hub. Carrying over nine million passengers per year, Glasgow Airport serves more Scottish destinations than any other airport and is a key component of Scotland’s transport infrastructure.

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Bristol Airport is South West England’s gateway to the world, with flights to over 110 destinations. Bristol Airport officially opened on 31 May by HRH Prince George, becoming only the third civil airport in the country. We are the ninth largest airport in the UK and England's third largest regional airport. Around 3,000 people work across our site, and our exciting development plans are creating new opportunities for people with a wide range of skills and specialisms. Serving our region with over 110 direct routes, we also act as an inbound gateway to the South West. Our airport is defined by our exceptional people, who have a passion for travel, a willingness to go the extra mile, and pride in operating our airport to the highest possible standards. Delivering a sustainable future for aviation is at the heart of our environmental approach. As a founder member of Sustainable Aviation, our plans for growing Bristol Airport minimise the environmental impact, while maximising the positive effect for Bristol – and beyond. Our aim? To be the UK’s most sustainable regional airport. In recent years Bristol Airport’s staff, business partners and passengers have raised over £250,000 for a variety of charities. This year Bristol Airport’s nominated local charity is Children’s Hospice South West.

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Newcastle Airport witnessed a surge in passenger traffic in the first eight months of 2013, toppling Liverpool John Lennon Airport as the UK’s tenth busiest airport. The Newcastle Airport handled more than 3.11 million passengers from January to August 2013. The airport, located about 9.6km from Newcastle city centre, is owned by seven local authorities holding 51% interest and AMP Capital, holding the remaining 49% interest. The airport was opened in 1935. It features a 2,329m long runway and a terminal. It has 26 passenger aprons and three freight aprons. The airport connects 81 destinations worldwide, and provides 3,200 on site jobs and a further 4,600 jobs across the region. The airport’s 45m air traffic control tower, designed by Reid Architecture, was commissioned in 2007. The airport is expected to serve 10 million passengers per annum by 2016.

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In 1930, British aero engineer and aircraft builder Richard Fairey paid the Vicar of Harmondsworth £15,000 for a 150-acre plot to build a private airport to assemble and test aircraft. Complete with a single grass runway and a handful of hastily erected buildings, Fairey’s Great West Aerodrome was the humble precursor to the world’s busiest international airport, Heathrow. During World War II the government requisitioned land in and around the ancient agricultural village of Heath Row, including Fairey’s Great West Aerodrome, to build RAF Heston, a base for long-range troop-carrying aircraft bound for the Far East. An RAF-type control tower was constructed and a ‘Star of David’ pattern of runways laid, the longest of which was 3,000 yards long and 100 yards wide. Work demolishing Heath Row and clearing land for the runways started in 1944. However, by the time the war had ended the RAF no longer needed another aerodrome and it was officially handed over to the Air Ministry as London’s new civil airport on 1 January 1946. The first aircraft to take off from Heathrow was a converted Lancaster bomber called Starlight that flew to Buenos Aires. The early passenger terminals were ex‑military marquees which formed a tented village along the Bath Road. The terminals were primitive but comfortable, equipped with floral-patterned armchairs, settees and small tables containing vases of fresh flowers. To reach aircraft parked on the apron, passengers walked over wooden duckboards to protect their footwear from the muddy airfield. There was no heating in the marquees, which meant that during winter it could be bitterly cold, but in summer when the sun shone, the marquee walls were removed to allow a cool breeze to blow through. By the close of Heathrow’s first operational year, 63,000 passengers had travelled through London’s new airport. By 1951 this had risen to 796,000 and British architect Frederick Gibberd was appointed to design permanent buildings for the airport. His plan saw the creation of a central area which was accessed via a ‘vehicular subway’ running underneath the original main runway. The focal point of Gibberd’s plan was a 122ft-high control tower. There was also a passenger terminal called the Europa Building and an office block called the Queens Building. By 1961 the old terminal on the north side had closed and airlines either operated from the Europa terminal (later renamed Terminal 2) or the Oceanic terminal (now Terminal 3). Terminal 1 opened in 1969, by which time five million passengers a year were passing through the airport as the jet age arrived with Boeing 707s, VC10s and Tridents taking travellers from Heathrow to and from all parts of the world. The 1970s marked the decade when the world became even smaller thanks to Concorde and wide-body jets such as the Boeing 747. As the decade drew to a close, 27 million passengers were using Heathrow annually. Demand for air travel also created the need for another terminal, Terminal 4, which opened for business in 1986. Today Heathrow is the world’s busiest international airport and the hub of the civil aviation world. Over 67 million passengers travel through the airport annually on services offered by 90 airlines travelling to over 180 destinations in over 90 countries. By the time Heathrow celebrated its 60th anniversary in 2006 it had handled around 1.4 billion passengers on over 14 million flights. The start of operations at Terminal 5 in March 2008 marked the beginning of an exciting new chapter for Heathrow. The brand new Terminal 2: The Queen's Terminal opened for business on 4 June 2014. The first airline to move in was United Airlines.

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Manchester Airport, located within a 20 minute drive from central Manchester, is the main international gateway for the north of England and is the largest regional airport in the UK. The airport handled more than 13.5 million passengers during the first eight months of 2013, making it the third busiest in the UK. The Manchester Airports Group Plc (MAG) is the country’s largest UK-owned airport operator. We own and operate three airports - Manchester, London Stansted, East Midlands. Our airports aren’t just popular, they’re multi-award-winning. Manchester Airport has won prestigious industry recognition for customer service, and holds the title of 'Best UK Airport'. We’re active and engaged in our local communities, with a positive approach to corporate responsibility. The Manchester Airports Group umbrella consists of the operations of Manchester Airport, alongside London Stansted and East Midlands. MAG Property and Cargo Operations also come under the remit of our brand, representing Manchester Airport as the global gateway to the North of England and beyond. Manchester Airport's cargo facility, the World Freight Terminal, is a community of more than 1,000 professionals managing freight-only aircraft as well as consignments that arrive or depart in the holds of passenger aircraft. The airport currently handles around 100,000 tonnes of import and export freight and mail annually.

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In February 2013, Manchester Airport Group (MAG) acquired London Stansted Airport, with ownership and operations handed over in a seamless process, ensuring staff and passengers could take advantage of the airport facilities as usual. Find out more about Stansted's history and plans for the future. London Stansted Airport is London's third-busiest airport, currently serving around 18 million passengers a year. Many leading low-cost scheduled airlines have made Stansted their base. MAG now serves nearly 42 million passengers through its ownership and operation of Manchester, London Stansted and East Midlands airports. Its property and facilities management arm, MAG Property, is responsible for the Group’s estate and also the development of Manchester’s Airport City. We support the UK Government's commitment to the principles of sustainable development in the aviation industry, striking a balance between economic, social and environmental considerations. MAG's overall strategic intent is to increase long term shareholder value by generating profitable growth, developing its assets and deploying efficient and customer focused operating processes throughout the business. More than just a regional success story, the Group’s airports and property business already contribute more than £3bn to the UK economy and support thousands of jobs. Acting as a gateway to the UK transport and road networks, London Stansted Airport's 24/7 cargo operation connects with the Greater London area and the Midlands, ensuring cargo operators a next level service which delivers 365 days a year. The aim of striking a balance between environmental impact and tapping into the economic growth of the area as a whole is the reason for a development outline for capitalising on ever increasing passenger numbers, providing a customer journey to savour in the coming years.

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In 1998, London Luton Airport Operations Limited (LLAOL) entered into a Concession Agreement for the management, operation and development of the airport with the local authority - Luton Borough Council (LBC). This agreement lasts until 2031 and LLAOL are wholly responsible for the airport during this time. Luton Airport's vision is to revolutionise the airport experience and deliver operational excellence, making air travel more accessible and enjoyable than ever before We want to grow to connect more people, countries and cultures by delighting our passengers with our passion and commitment to making travel accessible, easy and enjoyable. At Luton Airport We do everything we can to minimise our impact on the local community. LLA is committed to continuously improving its energy management and performance. We strive to reduce our carbon footprint and help our service partners to reduce theirs. We have a rigorous programme of Air Quality monitoring that helps us work out the airport’s contribution to local air emissions. We’ve recently linked our programme results to the data of surrounding Local Authorities and you can view their monthly online report. LLA is the fifth busiest airport in the UK and we know that the travel choices people make when getting to and from the airport can have a big impact on the environment. That’s why we’re championing the use of public transport for all our customers and staff.

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Gatwick Airport began life in 1930 as the Surrey Aero Club, a small flyers club, used exclusively by flying enthusiasts - however it did not stay this way for long. Four years later Gatwick was licensed as a public aerodrome, intended to provide regular air services to Paris and act as a relief aerodrome for London Croydon Airport. In this year Gatwick also gained its first scheduled flights – Hillman’s Airways to Belfast and Paris. The descendants of Hillman’s Airways still fly from Gatwick; though you might know them better as the company they later formed a part of - British Airways. Today, they have been joined by roughly 56 airlines flying to 228 destinations and carrying over 45 million passengers. We’ve come a long way since the 30s. Take a look below to see the key points in our journey from private aerodrome to RAF base to the busiest single-runway airport in the world. London Gatwick became an aerodrome back in the 1930s, but the airport we know today was officially opened on 9 June 1958 by Her Majesty The Queen. Over the last 60 years our airport has grown from just 186,000 passengers to over 46 million passengers in 2019. However, the global pandemic in 2020 saw international travel restricted and our passenger numbers fall to 10 million for the year.

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Anyone can be a Heritage Ambassador. Help take our past into the future. Spread the word and generate revenue. Make heritage your business and earn with your passion for art and culture. ArtAcadia.org is an umbrella organization for everything pertaining to our heritage and respective cultures. Providing a platform for Heritage Ambassadors, to help take our past into the future. We are a passionate community that is compiling a comprehensive global directory and cultural map. Facilitating networking, training, work opportunities, events and marketplace.

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